Art & Exhibitions

Art including paintings, sculpture, architecture, movie posters, multimedia art, and graphic design, sometimes incorporating poetry and prose. Also, reactions to art exhibitions and recommendations.
Life and Death by Gustav Klimt at the Leopold Museum in Vienna

Life and Death by Gustav Klimt at the Leopold Museum in Vienna

Ceiling of the Opera Garnier by Marc Chagall

Ceiling of the Opera Garnier by Marc Chagall

Albin Egger-Lienz, Finale, 1918

This work was part of one of the current exhibitions at the Leopold Museum in Vienna, “Trotzdem Kunst!” or “And Yet There Was Art!”. It’s a perfectly timed exhibit for both the 70th Anniversary of D-Day (which is today) and the 100 Year Anniversary of the start of World War I.

The exhibition includes works that vehemently protest war, such as Finale. The description of the work is as follows: “In his 1918 work Finale Egger-Lienz delivered a grim summary of the War by depicting a now calm battlefield with a fallen piece of paper inscribed with two dates. Finale is much more than merely a document of its time; it is an indictment against war in general that is unparalleled in 20th century art. The painting shows no horizon line and thus offers no escape for the eyes of the beholder. The colors of the faces, limbs and uniforms of the now stiff and grotesquely distorted bodies are matched with that of the soil and stand out from the ground merely through strong contours.”

Stills from Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel 

Also, http://vimeo.com/89302848

Pierre Auguste Renoir, Two Sisters (On the Terrace), 1881

Pierre Auguste Renoir, Two Sisters (On the Terrace), 1881

Danse Serpentine, Lumière Brothers, 1896

Van Gogh / Artaud. The Man Suicided by Society at the Musée d’Orsay
The main exhibit currently at the Orsay is a fresh look at the painter Vincent Van Gogh. Although Van Gogh is a ubiquitous artist whom everyone knows at least something about, the exhibit intersperses works by Van Gogh with excerpts from Artaud’s poetry in his book “The Man Suicided by Society”. The excerpts are paired with works that Artaud knew and wrote about, so the viewer is able to get a deeper sense of understanding of the paintings and Van Gogh’s own mental illness. Artaud ultimate argues that society drove Van Gogh to suicide because “the collective consciousness as a whole could not tolerate him”. I would recommend this exhibit to young adult and adult visitors who have any sort of interest in Van Gogh. Even though the artist is exhibited all around the world, this exhibit looks at the artist in a new way—through the eyes of Artaud—and the effect is extremely thought-provoking.
The exhibition is on view at the Musée d’Orsay until July 6th.

Van Gogh / Artaud. The Man Suicided by Society at the Musée d’Orsay

The main exhibit currently at the Orsay is a fresh look at the painter Vincent Van Gogh. Although Van Gogh is a ubiquitous artist whom everyone knows at least something about, the exhibit intersperses works by Van Gogh with excerpts from Artaud’s poetry in his book “The Man Suicided by Society”. The excerpts are paired with works that Artaud knew and wrote about, so the viewer is able to get a deeper sense of understanding of the paintings and Van Gogh’s own mental illness. Artaud ultimate argues that society drove Van Gogh to suicide because “the collective consciousness as a whole could not tolerate him”. I would recommend this exhibit to young adult and adult visitors who have any sort of interest in Van Gogh. Even though the artist is exhibited all around the world, this exhibit looks at the artist in a new way—through the eyes of Artaud—and the effect is extremely thought-provoking.

The exhibition is on view at the Musée d’Orsay until July 6th.

The British Museum

The Elgin Marbles at the British Museum are some of the most breathtaking sculptures in the history of western art. The sculptor of the Parthenon, Phidias, created the definition of “classical” through his strong, heroic compositions and beautiful wet drapery. The Three Goddesses in the second picture show Phidias’s employment of wet drapery, and the configuration of the goddesses shows the sculptor’s novel approach to dealing with the pediment form’s triangular shape. As the pediment form gets smaller, the figures begin to crouch down or recline to abide to the pedimental form. The metopes of the Parthenon are also extremely breathtaking. The metope shown in the last image is my personal favorite due to the heroic stance of the Lapith in contrast to the writhing Centaur. In addition, the drapery framing the two figures adds an element of beauty that is novel in comparison to the other metopes. The British Museum also has many other worthwhile paintings and sculptures, including the Rosetta Stone, the Nereid Monument and Hokusai’s Great Wave, but I find the Elgin Marbles to be the pinnacle of the works at the British Museum.

A French film poster for Quentin Tarantino’s “Reservoir Dogs” (1992)

A French film poster for Quentin Tarantino’s “Reservoir Dogs” (1992)

Calder and Abstraction at LACMA
The curation of this exhibit is particularly exceptional. The mobiles are placed within curved white structures that help frame the forms and make the colors pop. In addition, there are wonderfully preserved photographs showing Alexander Calder working in his studio and hanging out with other famous artists during the time such as Joan Miro and Jean Arp.
This exhibit is on view until July 27th.

Calder and Abstraction at LACMA

The curation of this exhibit is particularly exceptional. The mobiles are placed within curved white structures that help frame the forms and make the colors pop. In addition, there are wonderfully preserved photographs showing Alexander Calder working in his studio and hanging out with other famous artists during the time such as Joan Miro and Jean Arp.

This exhibit is on view until July 27th.